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To hear Nebraska's players tell it, Wednesday night's win over Seton Hall was just another day at the office.

For those guys, maybe it was. But for the 13,245 in attendance at Pinnacle Bank Arena, it was perhaps more. Maybe a lot more.

James Palmer scored 29 points after a horrific start, Nebraska overcame massive foul trouble and a bizarre officiating sequence midway through the second half, and the Huskers pulled away from Seton Hall for an 80-57 win in the teams' Gavitt Tipoff Games matchup.

"I don't think we're worried about preseason rankings or nothing like that. We're just focused on ourselves," Palmer said. "Tonight we just handled business."

Business wasn't great with about 13 minutes to go. Isaiah Roby had just been whistled for a dubious fourth foul as Isaac Copeland drilled a three-pointer that would have given the Huskers a nine-point lead.

Instead, Roby went to the bench, the PBA crowd went into hysterics, NU head coach Tim Miles was given a technical foul, and the officials stood at the monitor for six minutes of real time to make a minor clock adjustment.

By the time Seton Hall had made both technical free throws and gotten another bucket after the delay, Nebraska's lead was down to 44-42.

The Huskers outscored the Pirates 36-15 after that.

"It was pretty fun. The crowd gave us energy, and we just fed off of it," said Glynn Watson, who had 14 points and eight assists. "I think we just stayed together. I think we showed we can come back and make our run. 

"They made their run, so we made our run and after that we didn't turn back. That was a good thing for us, and we've got to keep learning."

There hadn't been much to learn in Nebraska's first two games, a pair of romps against overmatched opponents. And while Seton Hall (1-1) is trying to replace four senior starters, the Pirates had a legitimate scoring threat in guard Myles Powell (24 points) and a unique system that's difficult to prepare for.

But with its experienced starting five leading the way and solid contributions from its bench, Nebraska overcame a Seton Hall squad intent on mucking up the game and spoiling NU's strong start to the season.

"That was really big for us," said Copeland, who finished with 18 points, 10 rebounds and three blocked shots. "We hadn't really experienced anything like that in the first two games so far. So I think we really stayed together and really made push after (the technical)."

Miles likes his team, and proved it in the first half as Palmer missed his first eight shots from the field and Nebraska shot 28 percent overall in the first half. The coach stuck with Palmer, and he responded by making seven of his final 12 shots, drawing 11 fouls, and shooting 18 free throws. 

When Miles turned to his bench with the Huskers battling foul trouble, Tanner Borchardt, Brady Heiman, Nana Akenten and Amir Harris provided valuable minutes off the bench.

"What I feel comfortable with, is that they show up every day to work. There's not really this change of demeanor," Miles said. "They know what needs to be done."

Nebraska shot 59 percent in the second half. Watson finished one assist short of his career high. Thomas Allen, after an 0-for-4 first half, drilled a three-pointer to keep late-game momentum going after Palmer and Copeland sparked Nebraska's response.

Tougher tests await. Nebraska will face adversity again.

But when tested for the first time this season, the Huskers passed with flying colors.

Reach the writer at 402-473-7436 or cbasnett@journalstar.com. On Twitter @HuskerExtraCB.

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Husker basketball reporter

A Ravenna native, Chris covers the University of Nebraska men's basketball team and assists with football coverage. He spent nearly 10 years covering sports at the Kearney Hub and nearly four years at the Springfield News-Leader in Springfield, Mo.

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