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Rhode Island surfer Dan Fischer created the One Last Wave Project to use the healing power of the ocean to help families coping with a loss. He etches their loved one’s name onto one of his surfboards and takes them out into the ocean, in spirit anyway, for “one last wave,” as a way to memorialize them in a place that was meaningful to them. He started the project in January while coping with the loss of his father and his beloved dog. He says surfing is no longer a solitary pursuit, he's committed to helping the families and honoring them every time he goes out.

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Tributes are pouring in for actor Ray Liotta, who died at age 67 in the Dominican Republic. Liotta's “Goodfellas” co-star Robert De Niro says he's saddened to learn of the passing of Liotta, who is “way too young to have left us.” “Goodfellas” director Martin Scorsese said he was “so uniquely gifted, so adventurous, so courageous” as an actor. Another co-star from the film, Lorraine Bracco, says  she's “utterly shattered and that Liotta was the best part of making “Goodfellas.” Liotta's “Field of Dreams” co-star Kevin Costner says that while Liotta “leaves an incredible legacy, he'll always be Shoeless Joe Jackson in my heart.”

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Ray Liotta, the actor best known for playing mobster Henry Hill in “Goodfellas” and baseball player Shoeless Joe Jackson in “Field of Dreams,” has died. He was 67. An official at the Dominican Republic’s National Forensic Science Institute who was not authorized to speak to the media confirmed the death of Ray Liotta and said his body was taken to the Cristo Redentor morgue. Liotta’s publicist, Jen Allen, said he was in the Dominican Republic shooting a new movie and didn’t wake up Thursday morning. Liotta's most iconic role, as real life mobster Henry Hill in Martin Scorsese’s “Goodfellas” came in 1990.

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Andy “Fletch” Fletcher, keyboardist for British synth pop giants Depeche Mode for more than 40 years, has died at age 60. The band announced the death of the founding member on its official social media pages. A person close to the band said Fletcher died Thursday from natural causes at his home in the United Kingdom. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly.  Fletcher formed Depeche Mode along with fellow synthesizer players Vince Clarke and Martin Gore, and lead singer Dave Gahan, in Basildon, England, in 1980. He would go on to play on hits including “Just Can't Get Enough,” “People are People" and “Personal Jesus.”

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Alan White, the longtime drummer for progressive rock pioneers Yes who also played on projects with John Lennon and George Harrison, has died. He was 72. White’s death was announced on his Facebook page by his family. The post said he died at his Seattle-area home on Thursday after a brief illness. Just days earlier Yes had announced that due to health issues White would not take part in the band’s upcoming tour of the United Kingdom. White joined Yes in 1972, replacing original drummer Bill Bruford. In a band noted for frequent lineup changes, White was a constant and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of Yes in 2017.

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Baz Luhrmann was first in Cannes exactly 30 years ago with his debut “Strictly Ballroom,” which he recalls barely making a sound at the festival. That’s emphatically not the case for “Elvis,” an operatic opus about the larger-than-life music legend that premiered Wednesday in Cannes with all the clamor of a carnival. For a mythologized icon often recalled either in “King of Rock ‘n’ Roll” camp or as an epitome of cultural appropriation, Luhrmann’s “Elvis” seeks to make alive Presley’s power as a radical artistic force forged in Black blues and gospel whose unconventionality posed a threat to mainstream America.

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The Boston Pops Fireworks Spectacular, a July Fourth holiday tradition in the city, is returning to its full glory after a three-year coronavirus hiatus. The Boston Symphony Orchestra announced Thursday that the show at the Hatch Memorial Shell on the Charles River Esplanade will feature not only the Boston Pops under the direction of conductor Keith Lockhart for the 27th year, but the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, the Middlesex County Volunteers Fifes & Drums, and special guest performers that will be announced at a later date. This year’s free show will also include a tribute to the late David Mugar, who revitalized the event in 1974.

Literary ‘superagent’ Mort Janklow, whose clients included Ronald Reagan and Barbara Walters, has died at age 91. The cause was heart failure. He was a colorful former corporate attorney who brokered big contracts for political, publishing and entertainment leaders. Besides Reagan and Walters, his clients included Al Gore, David McCullough and William Safire. In 1988, he and fellow agent Lynn Nesbit founded Janklow & Nesbit Associates, where authors also included Tom Wolfe and Robert Caro. Janklow was credited, and faulted, for the proliferation of blockbuster books and million-dollar deals in the 1970s and beyond.

Family and friends are remembering a Pennsylvania man who was the last known survivor of a World War II POW massacre that occurred during the Battle of the Bulge. Harold Billow died May 17. He was 99. Billow's Army unit surrendered and he was taken prisoner by Waffen SS soldiers as German forces launched their offensive in December 1944. According to various accounts, the Germans opened fire on the unarmed prisoners, killing more than 80 in what came to be known as the Malmedy Massacre. Billow said he played dead for hours before he and other survivors were able to reach safety. Billow will be buried Thursday.

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This week’s new entertainment releases include a new album from Def Leppard, a five-part Apple+ series on dinosaurs and a documentary about the late composer Stephen Sondheim and his musical “Company.” Martin Freeman stars as a deeply troubled English police officer in “The Responder,” debuting Tuesday, on the Britbox streaming service. “Navalny,” the riveting documentary about Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, has been making the rounds in theaters and on CNN, but starting Thursday it’ll be available on HBO Max as well. And the weekend’s big movie is also a place for new music: The soundtrack from “Top Gun: Maverick” features singles by Lady Gaga and OneRepublic.

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Longtime New Yorker writer and editor Roger Angell has died. He was 101. The New Yorker announced his death. Other details were not immediately available. Angell, the son of founding New Yorker editor Katharine White and stepson of E.B. White, contributed hundreds of essays and stories to the magazine over a 70-year career. He also edited such authors as John Updike and Garrison Keillor. Angell also was a past winner of the BBWAA Career Excellence Award, formerly the J. G. Taylor Spink Award, for meritorious contributions to baseball writing.

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Attorneys for the U.S. government have indicated that they will not oppose a plan to lift all remaining restrictions next month on John Hinckley Jr. He is the man who tried to assassinate President Ronald Reagan in 1981. A federal judge in Washington ruled last year that Hinckley can be freed unconditionally in June if he continues to follow the rules placed on him and remains mentally stable. U.S. attorneys said in a letter to the court on Thursday that he has. The 66-year-old has been living in Williamsburg, Virginia. A court hearing is scheduled for June 1.

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Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has thanked the United States for the $40 billion aid package, which got final congressional approval. He also thanked the European Union for its support in his nightly video address to the nation. Zelenskyy says Ukraine’s monthly budget deficit is $5 billion. To survive in the war for freedom, he says Ukraine needs quick and sufficient financial support. The U.S. has announced a shipment of $100 million in military equipment to Ukraine, separate from what will be coming from the $40 billion approved by Congress.

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Rosmarie Trapp, whose Austrian family the von Trapps was made famous in the musical and beloved movie “The Sound of Music,” has died. Trapp Family Lodge says she died Friday at the age of 93 at a nursing home in Morrisville, Vermont. Rosmarie was the first daughter of Austrian naval Capt. Georg von Trapp and Maria von Trapp and a younger half-sibling of the older von Trapp children portrayed on stage and in the movie. The family escaped from Nazi-occupied Austria in 1938 and performed singing tours throughout Europe and America. They settled in Vermont in the early 1940s and opened a ski lodge in Stowe.

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Heart surgeon-turned-TV celebrity Dr. Mehmet Oz and former hedge fund CEO David McCormick are locked in a too-early-to-call race for the Republican nomination to fill an open Pennsylvania U.S. Senate seat. Vote counting continued Wednesday. Some counties have yet to tabulate election-day and mail-in ballots in the presidential battleground state. Meanwhile, counting of provisional, overseas and military absentee ballots could last past Friday. The race remains close enough to trigger Pennsylvania’s automatic recount law. Oz has been helped by an endorsement from former President Donald Trump. Pennsylvania Lt. Gov. John Fetterman won the Democratic nomination as he recovered from a stroke he suffered Friday.

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A 13-year-old Utah boy has died a day after a sand dune he was digging in collapsed and buried him at a state park. Officials say Ian Spendlove, of Santa Clara, had been digging a tunnel into the dune at southern Utah's Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park when it collapsed on him Saturday evening. A family member alerted authorities, and park rangers arrived to dig the boy out from what they said was over 6 feet of sand. Spendlove was taken to a St. George hospital and then to Primary Children’s Hospital in Salt Lake City. The Utah Division of State Parks Department says he died there Sunday after not regaining brain activity.

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The last full day of campaigning in Pennsylvania’s hotly contested primaries for governor and U.S. Senate is under way, with a top Senate candidate in the hospital and establishment Republicans trying to stave off victories by candidates they view as too toxic to win in the fall. Lt. Gov. John Fetterman, who is leading in polls in the Democratic Senate primary, remained in the hospital Monday after suffering a stroke right before the weekend. Meanwhile, new attack ads are airing against late-surging Republican Senate candidate Kathy Barnette as many in the party establishment have begun trying to consolidate their support to prevent Doug Mastriano from winning the party’s gubernatorial nomination.

Maggie Peterson, whose character on “The Andy Griffith Show” developed a memorable infatuation with Mayberry sheriff Andy Taylor, has died, her family said Monday. She was 81. A post to her Facebook page said Peterson died in her sleep on Sunday with her family present. According to the post, Peterson’s health took a turn for the worse when her husband, Gus Mancuso, died of Alzheimer’s disease in 2021 at age 88. After his death, Peterson moved back to Colorado to be closer to her relatives. The family said a private service will be held in the next few weeks.

Longtime news executive Richard Wald has died at age 92 after suffering a stroke this week. Wald was a former NBC News president who also helped build ABC News into a powerhouse through the 1980s and 1990s with mercurial boss Roone Arledge. He worked at newspapers, two of them now defunct, before turning to television, saying “I didn’t leave newspapers. Newspapers left me.” He's credited with giving a name to ABC's “Nightline” and was the model for the network news executive in the movie “Network.” Wald also taught journalism at his alma mater, Columbia University and worked with the Pulitzer, duPont and Peabody awards.

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