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The author of “Heat” writes of his adventures working in restaurant kitchens in Lyon, France. “So much cooking and eating gets done that Buford’s next book, after ‘Heat’ and ‘Dirt,’ in order to preserve the ‘Eat, Pray, Love’ cadence, should probably be titled ‘Gout,’” wrote New York Times reviewer Dwight Garner. “I admire this book enormously; it’s a profound and intuitive work of immersive journalism.”

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Speaking of Agatha Christie, Weinberg’s acclaimed debut (named one of The New York Times’ 10 best crime novels of 2020), set on a Norfolk, England, college campus, features a murder at its center that “might have met with the approval of the Queen of Crime” herself, wrote NYT reviewer Marilyn Stasio. “Dame Agatha happens to figure tangentially in this uncommonly clever whodunit, which makes plentiful references to her books, plot twists, settings and even the 11 days in 1926 when she inexplicably disappeared — all while coming across as madly original.” (Penguin, $17, out Jan. 26)

Nebraska has the 19th-lowest per capita deaths from COVID-19, according New York Times data. A Dec. 23 letter to the editor confused the per c…

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This New York Times bestseller isn’t your average celebrity memoir. Best known for playing Lt. Sulu on “Star Trek” in the 1960s, this graphic memoir tells the story of George Takei’s childhood when he was imprisoned in an internment camp for those of Japanese descent in the United States during World War II. When he was 4, his entire family was forced from their home into a concentration camp, where they were held for years. The book explores the courage he and his family showed as well as their hope in democracy. $9.99, amazon.com

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Speaking of therapists, “The Silent Patient” by Alex Michaelides stars an especially interesting one — and his colleagues (and the instantly questionable setting) are equally intriguing. I can say no more, except that it absolutely deserves its seemingly unending run on the New York Times bestseller list. I could not put it down.

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James’ thick saga — the first in a planned trilogy taking place in a fantasy land inspired by African history and mythology — follows a tracker hired to find a child who has mysteriously vanished. New York Times books critic Michiko Kakutani wrote, “In these pages, James conjures the literary equivalent of a Marvel Comics universe — filled with dizzying, magpie references to old movies and recent TV, ancient myths and classic comic books, and fused into something new and startling by his gifts for language and sheer inventiveness.”

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You just might need the warm, chatty delights of a Lipman novel. This one, her 11th, is about an old yearbook that goes astray, causing troubles for its owner’s grown daughter and the busybody documentary filmmaker who finds it. A New York Times reviewer described it as “a caper novel, light as a feather and effortlessly charming” and said it “inspires a very specific kind of modern joy.”

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Pushing back against explosive reports his own administration is conspiring against him, President Donald Trump lashed out against the anonymous senior official who wrote an opinion piece in The New York Times claiming to be part of a "resistance" working "from within" to thwart the commander-in-chief's most dangerous impulses.

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