Skip to main contentSkip to main content
In honor of Independence Day, The Lincoln Journal Star is providing unlimited access to all of our content from June 28th-July 4th! Presented by University of Nebraska - Lincoln
Updating results

National Governments

  • Updated

R. Kelly has been sentenced to 30 years in prison for using his R&B superstardom to subject young fans to systematic sexual abuse. The singer and songwriter was convicted of racketeering and sex trafficking last year at a trial that gave voice to accusers who had once wondered if their stories were ignored because they were Black women. U.S. District Judge Ann Donnelly imposed the sentence at a courthouse in Brooklyn. The sentence caps a slow-motion fall for Kelly, who is 55. He remained adored by legions of fans even after allegations about his abuse of young girls began circulating publicly in the 1990s.

  • Updated

A contingent of South Dakota Republican lawmakers have announced a group called the “South Dakota Freedom Caucus” as they try to drive state politics further to the right. In its first official statement, the caucus called for an immediate special legislative session to address the state’s abortion laws. The state already has a trigger law that banned abortion last week when the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade. Republican Gov. Kristi Noem and legislative leaders are already planning a special session, but have not said when it will be or what specific legislation will be considered. The formalization of the Freedom Caucus threatens to drive a further wedge among GOP lawmakers in Pierre.

  • Updated

New York leaders plan to ban people from carrying firearms into many places of business unless the owners put up a sign saying guns are welcome. Gov. Kathy Hochul said Wednesday that she and lawmakers have agreed on the broad strokes of a gun control bill that the Democratic-led Legislature is poised to pass Thursday. The legislation was written after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the state’s handgun licensing law. It will also include provisions that make it harder to apply for a permit to carry a gun outside the home and create more rules around firearm storage.

  • Updated

The first Black woman confirmed for the Supreme Court, Ketanji Brown Jackson, is officially becoming a justice. Jackson will be sworn as the court’s 116th justice at midday Thursday, just as the man she is replacing, Justice Stephen Breyer, retires. Breyer says in a letter to President Joe Biden that his retirement will take effect at noon, after nearly 28 years on the nation’s highest court. Earlier in the day the court is expected to issue its final opinions in a momentous and rancorous term that included overturning Roe v. Wade’s guarantee of the right to an abortion.

  • Updated

Cristiano Ronaldo wants a U.S. judge to order a woman’s lawyer to pay the international soccer star more than $626,000 after claiming in a failed lawsuit in 2018 that Ronaldo raped the woman in Las Vegas nearly a decade earlier. The woman’s attorney, Leslie Mark Stovall, didn't immediately respond Wednesday to messages about the request. The judge on June 10 kicked the case out of court to punish Stovall for “bad-faith conduct” and the improper use of leaked and stolen documents to press the woman's case. The bid for court costs and fees dwarfs a $375,000 hush-money payment the woman received in 2010 to drop her claim she was sexually assaulted.

  • Updated

Louisiana's attorney general is warning doctors against performing abortions, despite a judge’s order blocking the state from enforcing its ban on the procedure. Attorney General Jeff Landry said in a letter to the Louisiana State Medical Society that the state judge’s Monday order blocking enforcement “has limited reach” and that abortion remains a crime in Louisiana after Friday's Supreme Court decision ending abortion rights. That decision has prompted legal fights in multiple states. Lawyers for abortion providers asked the Ohio Supreme Court on Wednesday to overturn the state ban on abortions at the first detectable “fetal heartbeat.” Kentucky’s two abortion clinics asked a judge to block that state's abortion ban.

  • Updated

The House Jan. 6 committee has now heard dramatic testimony from former White House aides and others about Donald Trump’s efforts to overturn the 2020 election. It's also heard of his encouragement to supporters before they marched to the Capitol and violently broke in. But it’s still far from clear whether any of Trump’s actions were criminal, or whether he will be charged.  Former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson provided explosive testimony to the committee that opened up new legal issues about Trump’s role in the Jan. 6, 2021 insurrection — including testimony that he knew protesters were armed and he wanted to go to the Capitol with them.

  • Updated

A special election in Nebraska that was supposed to be an easy win for House Republicans ended up as the tightest race in decades in the GOP-dominated district. The results in the mostly rural 1st Congressional District are boosting the confidence of Democrats who tapped into public outrage over the U.S. Supreme Court’s abortion ruling. Republicans still won the open seat as expected, but the margin has surprised even some local Democrats who have grown accustomed to lopsided defeats. Unofficial results show Republican Mike Flood beat Democrat Patty Pansing Brooks with 53.2% of the vote in Tuesday’s special election. Pansing Brooks received 46.8%.

Laws banning most abortions at the point of the “first detectable heartbeat"are beginning to take effect following the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overturn the nearly 50-year-old Roe v. Wade decision. Court actions in states including Ohio, South Carolina and Tennessee have revived laws stalled under Roe and left some abortion seekers and clinics scrambling. Generally, abortion is still legal in states under such laws until six to eight weeks into pregnancy. Clinics, abortion rights and some faith groups are mobilizing to help women beyond that point get abortions elsewhere. Some abortion foes also are providing family-related resources online.

A federal judge has refused to block an Indiana law that will impose strict limits on charitable groups that pay the bail money needed to get people released from jail. The ruling issued Wednesday will allow the law to take effect as scheduled on Friday. The national nonprofit group The Bail Project and the American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit challenging the law, arguing it violated the group’s First Amendment and equal protection rights for its advocacy work. Judge James Patrick Hanlon denied a requested injunction blocking the law, ruling that the group hadn’t shown a likelihood that it would succeed in proving the law unconstitutional.

  • Updated

After the U.S. Supreme Court ruled last week that abortion is not a constitutional right, federal and state courts around the country saw a rush of activity as abortion rights advocates raised new legal challenges and states sought judges’ clearance to limit abortions. Some of the disputes involve state abortion bans or restrictions that have been on the books for generations. Some involve “trigger laws” that were specifically designed to take effect if Roe were to fall. Many state bans were held up in court for years, pending the high court’s decision on Roe, and are now moving forward — amid challenges. With the new legal questions centering on state constitutions, it’s likely that answers will vary widely, and the legal debate over abortion will continue to change.

  • Updated

The U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that had provided a constitutional right to abortion. The June 24 ruling is expected to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states. In anticipation of the decision, several states led by Democrats have taken steps to protect abortion access. The decision also sets up the potential for legal fights between the states over whether providers and those who help women obtain abortions can be sued or prosecuted.

  • Updated

One of only a few boarding schools for Native American students still run directly by the federal government in Oregon is undergoing a close look at the school’s finances by the Interior Department’s Office of Inspector General. The office confirmed last month in an email to Oregon Public Broadcasting that it had “initiated an audit of the financial management and financial oversight of the Chemawa Indian School.” The audit came in response to Democratic U.S. Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley, who requested the inquiry after they felt stymied in their own efforts to look into alleged problems at the school.

  • Updated

Top Indiana lawmakers are delaying until late July the start of a special legislative session during which they are expected to consider tougher anti-abortion laws following U.S. Supreme Court’s decision ending the constitutional right to abortion. Republican Gov. Eric Holcomb called last week for a special session beginning July 6 to take up a tax refund proposal. But when the Supreme Court issued its abortion ruling  days later, Republican legislative leaders said lawmakers would also debate anti-abortion measures. Leaders of the Republican-dominated Legislature announced Wednesday that lawmakers would convene starting July 25 to allow sufficient preparation time.

  • Updated

The Supreme Court's ruling allowing states to regulate abortion has set off a travel scramble in some parts of the U.S.,  as abortion providers redirect patients to states that still allow the procedure. A growing number of states are moving to mostly banning abortion. Clinics operators are moving, doctors are counseling crying patients, donations are pouring into nonprofits and one group is dispatching vans to administer abortion pills. Some cities _ like Kansas City and St. Louis _ also are drafting plans to help with the travel logistics. Groups are trying to help with everything from gas cards for travel to connecting patients with small aircraft pilots willing to transport them to a clinic in another state.

  • Updated

Louisiana’s Supreme Court has ruled that the man who killed a former NFL player in a New Orleans-area road rage incident cannot be tried again for murder after his conviction on a lesser charge was overturned. Authorities in the New Orleans suburb of Jefferson Parish originally charged Ronald Gasser with second-degree murder in the 2016 shooting of Joe McKnight. A jury convicted Gasser of manslaughter instead. But that verdict was later overturned because it came from a non-unanimous jury. Prosecutors went to the Supreme Court after lower courts said they could retry McKnight for manslaughter but not on the murder charge. Gasser claimed he shot McKnight in self-defense.

New York City and state officials have announced lawsuits against 10 sellers of gun parts that the officials said can be assembled into untraceable ghost guns and sold without background checks. State Attorney General Letitia James and New York City Mayor Eric Adams said the weapons sold by online ghost gun retailers have been found at a growing share of New York’s crime scenes. James said the companies “have sold tens of thousands of illegal ghost guns” in New York. An attorney for one of the companies called the lawsuits a “groundless attempt” to limit the rights of New Yorkers.

  • Updated

A federal appeals court has thrown out the 2020 conspiracy and bribery convictions of a former major political donor in North Carolina and his associate. A three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals vacated the convictions and ordered new trials for Greg E. Lindberg and John D. Gray. The appeals court declared that the trial judge erred in his jury instructions to the point that it called the verdicts into question. Lindberg is a wealthy insurance and investment firm founder accused by federal investigators of attempting to bribe North Carolina’s insurance commissioner to secure preferential regulatory treatment for his business.

  • Updated

The daughter of two Malian refugees has become the first Black member of a state government in Germany. Aminata Touré was named Wednesday to the Cabinet of Governor Daniel Günther in Germany’s state of Schleswig-Holstein. The 29-year-old member of the environmentalist Green party will oversee the Social Affairs Ministry in the coalition government led by Günther, a Christian Democrat. Touré became a state lawmaker in 2017. Two years later she was elected deputy speaker, the first Black person to hold such a position in any of Germany’s 16 states. Touré said in 2019 that she was inspired to run for office by Barack Obama’s successful U.S. presidential campaign. Germany has never had a Black minister in the federal government.

  • Updated

The head of the World Health Organization has criticized the U.S. Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus called the decision to no longer recognize a constitutional right to abortion “a setback” that would ultimately cost lives. Tedros said during a media briefing on Wednesday that decades of “irrefutable” scientific data prove that access to safe and legal abortion saves lives. He said safe abortion should be understood as health care and warned that limiting its access would disproportionately hit women from the poorest and most marginalized communities. Tedros says he fears other countries might not understand the implications of the U.S. ruling and move to restrict abortions.

  • Updated

With abortion now or soon to be illegal in over a dozen states and severely restricted in many more, Big Tech companies that collect personal details of their users are facing new calls to limit that tracking and surveillance. One fear is that law enforcement or vigilantes could use data troves from Facebook, Google and other social platforms against people seeking ways to end unwanted pregnancies. History has repeatedly demonstrated that whenever people’s personal data is tracked and stored, there’s always a risk that it could be misused or abused.

  • Updated

Two of Congress’ staunchest conservatives repelled more centrist challengers to lock up Republican nominations on Tuesday. That happened even as the party’s voters chose to turn out a six-term incumbent in Mississippi. Illinois Republican Rep. Mary Miller, who called the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade a “historic victory for white life” during a weekend rally with former President Donald Trump — her spokesperson said she misspoke — defeated fellow GOP incumbent Rodney Davis. Another Trump ally, Colorado Rep. Lauren Boebert, one of Congress’ most polarizing members, easily beat back a challenge from a more mainstream Republican. Mississippi Republican Rep. Steven Palazzo, a six-term incumbent, lost to Sheriff Mike Ezell.

  • Updated

Tulsa attorney Gentner Drummond has knocked off incumbent Attorney General John O’Connor in the Republican primary in the race for Oklahoma attorney general. With no Democrat and only a Libertarian on the November ballot, Tuesday’s victory for the 58-year-old Drummond means he is almost certain to be Oklahoma’s next attorney general. The 67-year-old O’Connor was Republican Gov. Kevin Stitt’s hand-picked successor after former Attorney General Mike Hunter resigned last year. Drummond is a former fighter pilot who served eight years in the military before getting his law degree from Georgetown University and returning to Oklahoma.

  • Updated

The Supreme Court has ruled that Oklahoma can prosecute non-Native Americans for crimes committed on tribal land when the victim is Native American. The 5-4 decision on Wednesday cut back on the high court’s ruling from 2020 that said a large chunk of eastern Oklahoma remains an American Indian reservation. That first decision left the state unable to prosecute Native Americans accused of crimes on tribal lands that include most of Tulsa, the state’s second-largest city with a population of about 413,000. But the justices said Oklahoma can step in when the victims are tribal members and their accused assailant is not.

  • Updated

Colorado Republicans have rejected two prominent election deniers in primaries Tuesday night. It's a setback for the movement to install backers of former President Donald Trump's election lies in positions with power over voting. Mesa County Clerk Tina Peters lost the Republican primary for secretary of state to Pam Anderson, a former clerk in suburban Denver. Peters was indicted for her role in a break-in of her county's election system. An ally, State Rep. Ron Hanks, lost his bid for the GOP Senate nomination. Hanks attended the Jan. 6 protests. He was beaten by businessman Joe O'Dea, a rare GOP backer of some abortion rights.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News

Husker News