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Memoir

Fans of the late actor Anne Heche can get their hands on her 2001 memoir, "Call Me Crazy." But only if they're willing to spend a pretty penny on it. Heche's tell-all memoir — which recounted her tragic childhood, her ascent in Hollywood and her high-profile relationship with Ellen DeGeneres — has spiked in price days after the actor's death at age 53. "Call Me Crazy" now fetches anywhere from ...

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NONFICTION: Erika Sánchez's memoir is a raw and raunchy coming-of-age tale. Believe it or not, it's also uplifting. "Crying in the Bathroom" by Erika Sánchez; Viking (256 pages, $27) ——— Erika Sánchez's debut novel for young adults, "I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter," offered a fictional account of the constraints of growing up in a poor immigrant family in Chicago. Sánchez's latest, ...

Comedy and tragedy: For actress, producer and TV writer Laura Chinn, they both begin with zits. “I wasn’t aware of my face until there was something suddenly wrong with it. A small, white ball popped out of my right cheek and then, like magic, I realized I had a face,” Chinn writes in the opening of her new book, “Acne: A Memoir” (Hachette), which hit bookstores July 19. But Chinn’s story – ...

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Molly Shannon concluded a successful 2021 on television (starring in the comedies “White Lotus,” “The Other Two” and “I Love That For You”) with a memoir — "Hello, Molly!" — that is just as enthralling to read as she is to watch on screen.

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Few actors are more beloved than Bob Odenkirk, a brilliant comedian who ended up becoming a brilliant dramatic actor. His new memoir tells the story of that transition, beginning with Odenkirk’s early years at Second City, his work on the acclaimed “Mr. Show” and the phone call that would change his life by offering him the part of Saul Goodman on “Breaking Bad.”

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David Sedaris’ “Happy-Go-Lucky” ($29, Little Brown) is like a reminder of an old friend who can still make you laugh out loud, but with a poignance now. Subjects include the ugliness of his father, art school in Chicago (“if you could draw Snoopy on a napkin, you were in”) and entitled fans.

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“Crying in the Bathroom” (Viking, $27), by Erika L. Sanchez, is an account of childhood depression and falling in love with comedy. It’s also a lesson in nurturing a clear voice.

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"From Scratch" is a sparkling tribute to serendipitous love. It’s easy to see why the literary debut of actor, producer and health care advocate Tembi Locke not only earned a coveted spot in Reese Witherspoon’s book club, but is also being adapted for Netflix. This warm but heart-wrenching memoir about travel, food, family and resilience in the aftermath of loss recounts Locke’s love story with Saro, an Italian chef she met while studying abroad. The audiobook is read by the author, whose narration will make you laugh and cry, often at the same time.

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Acclaimed author Nadia Owusu’s “Aftershocks” is a profoundly moving memoir about her nomadic childhood and the devastating effect it had on her search for identity. Abandoned by her mother, Owusu spent her younger years traveling with her father, a United Nations official. But when he died when she was barely in her teens, she found herself unmoored and virtually alone in the world. Narrating the audiobook herself, Owusu describes a life of near-constant geographic upheaval, conjuring up vivid images of Rome, New York, Ghana, Tanzania, London, Ethiopia and more.

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