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Italian designer Sabato De Sarno has been named the new creative director of Gucci, and will unveil his first collection during Milan Fashion Week next September, Gucci and parent company Kering announced Saturday. De Sarno has previously worked for Prada, Dolce & Gabbana and Valentino, where he was most recently fashion director overseeing both men’s and women’s collections.  Speculation has been rife in the fashion world over who would succeed Alessandro Michele after he stepped down from the role unexpectedly last fall, after nearly eight years in which he redefined the brand’s codes with gender fluid, romantic and eclectic looks. Like Michele when he was named in 2015 to the post, De Sarno is relatively unknown in the wider fashion world.

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Utah lawmakers on Friday approved a measure that would ban most transgender youth from receiving gender-affirming health care — including surgery or puberty blockers. The bill now goes to the desk of Republican Gov. Spencer Cox, who hasn’t yet taken a position on the legislation. The measure comes as legislators in at least 18 states consider similar bills targeting health care for young transgender people. Utah’s measure prohibits transgender surgery for youth and disallows hormone treatments for minors who have not yet been diagnosed with gender dysphoria. The state’s Legislature made the topic a top priority, hearing the first draft just two days after the session started earlier this month.

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A proposed bill to deny gender-affirming care to young transgender people in Montana drew emotional testimony in a Friday hearing. Supporters argued it is needed to protect children, and opponents called it government overreach that would harm transgender children by denying them medically necessary treatment. The bill threatens health care providers with the loss of their license for a year if they use puberty blockers, hormones or surgery to treat transgender minors. A similar bill failed in the 2021 Legislature after receiving strong opposition from medical experts, human rights advocates and the transgender community. Sen. John Fuller's bill would also ban Montana Medicare payments for medication or surgical treatments for transgender minors.

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A lawyer representing the leaders of North Carolina’s state employee health plan has defended its exclusion of gender affirming treatments before a federal appeals court. State Treasurer Dale Folwell and the State Health Plan’s executive administrator are seeking to overturn a trial court order demanding that the plan pay for “medically necessary services,” including hormone therapy and some surgeries, for transgender employees and their children. Attorney John Knepper told a three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Wednesday that the plan routinely excludes some medically necessary procedures based on cost, but does not make any of those determinations based on sex or gender.

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Drag queens in full makeup and dozens of other advocates are rallying against Missouri bills aimed at transgender children and drag shows. A House committee debated the measures Tuesday. Bills under consideration would ban transgender girls from playing on girls sports teams. Public K-12 schools would face lawsuits or losing all state funding for violating the policy. Other legislation would prohibit doctors from providing any gender-affirming treatment for transgender minors. Another bill would make it a misdemeanor crime punishable by up to a year in jail for performing in drag in public or where a minor could watch.

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The Republican-controlled Mississippi House voted Thursday to ban gender-confirming care for minors, joining about a dozen other conservative states in trying to restrict health care access for young transgender people. Republican Rep. Nick Bain said in response to Democrats’ questions that he knows no examples of such surgeries being done on people younger than 18 in Mississippi. He said some young transgender people have received hormone treatments in the state, but he did not know how many. Democratic Rep. Bryant Clark said the bill is “a solution in search of a problem.” The bill goes to the Republican-controlled Senate for more work.

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Utah is among a group of states considering limiting transgender kids from receiving certain health care, including puberty blockers, hormones and surgery. The proposals reflect how lawmakers in red states are continuing to make matters related to gender, sexuality and youth central to their legislative agenda. LGBTQ families and their advocates argue decision-making should be left to doctors and patients and say that given transgender youth's disproportionately high suicide rates, questions about treatment are often matters of life or death. Republican lawmakers argue the government needs to regulate the growing field of transgender health care to protect children.

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Men’s Fashion Week in Paris was in top form with a second day of runway shows touting a dynamic season. Presentations on Wednesday showcased brands such as Dior, Vuitton, Issey Miyake and Givenchy roaring back from the pandemic. The eyepopping display that Bluemarble designer Anthony Alvarez put on inside the American Cathedral was a typical melting pot of streetwear, tailoring and cross-cultural, country-hopping references. Designer Anthony Vaccarello brought the long, dark elongated silhouettes of Saint Laurent’s women’s wardrobe to a gender-fluid and aesthetically precise fall collection. For her third show in Paris, Bianca Saunders featured a minimalist, often oversized aesthetic that darted effortlessly between cultures.

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A group of South Dakota Republican lawmakers are pushing a bill to outlaw gender-affirming health care for transgender youth. At least a dozen states are considering anti-transgender legislation this year. The South Dakota bill aims to keep children under 18 from accessing puberty-blocking drugs, hormone therapy or surgeries that enable them to present as a gender different from the sex on their birth certificate. It would also punish doctors who provide the care by revoking their medical license and exposing them to civil litigation. South Dakota Republicans have perennially considered bills aimed at limiting the health care, school facilities and sports teams that transgender youth can access.

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The British government says it will block a law designed to make it easier for people in Scotland to legally change their gender. Secretary of State for Scotland Alister Jack said he was vetoing the bill approved by the Scottish parliament because of concern it conflicts with “Great Britain-wide equalities legislation” which guarantees women and girls access to single-sex spaces such as changing rooms and shelters. The Scottish bill allows people 16 or older to change the gender designation on their identity documents by self-declaration, removing the need for a medical diagnosis of gender dysphoria. The Scottish government is likely to challenge Monday's decision at the U.K. Supreme Court.

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The Illinois governor has signed into law sweeping reproductive health care legislation to protect out-of-state abortion seekers, adding Illinois to the list of states who have placed legal reinforcements around the procedure. Democratic Gov. J.B. Pritzker's signature Friday shields reproductive and gender-affirming health care patients and providers from legal action originating across state lines. The law will also protect the Illinois licenses of health care providers licensed in multiple states who provide treatment legal in Illinois but may cost them their license in a state where it’s not. It also prevent insurers from charging more for out-of-network care when in-network providers object to treatment on moral grounds.

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Wisconsin Republicans have again allowed therapists, social workers and counselors to try to change LGBTQ clients’ gender identities and sexual orientations — a scientifically discredited practice known as conversion therapy. A licensing board under Democratic Gov. Tony Evers' administration passed a ban on conversion therapy in 2020, but the Republican-controlled Legislature's rules committee blocked it then and did so again Thursday along a 6-4 vote. Implementing a temporary ban allows Republican lawmakers to avoid a veto from Evers. LGBTQ rights advocates oppose the practice, citing research suggesting it can increase the risk of suicide and depression.

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Illinois lawmakers approved during the last day of their lame-duck session a measure that would secure access to reproductive and gender-affirming health care. The legislation makes Illinois the latest state to pursue abortion rights protections since the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last June. They pushed for approval Tuesday because a new round of lawmakers will be sworn in Wednesday. The bill, now headed to Democratic Gov. J.B. Pritzker’s desk for approval, would shield reproductive and gender-affirming health care patients and providers from out-of-state legal action and widen access to reproductive care, among other things.

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Republican state lawmakers are following up a midterm election and record flow of anti-transgender legislation last year by zeroing in on bodily autonomy with proposals to limit gender-affirming health care and abortion access. More than two dozen bills seeking to restrict transgender health care access have been pre-filed in 11 states. Other bills targeting transgender people are expected in several additional states with GOP majorities. Gender-affirming health care providers and parents of trans youths are the primary targets. A growing list of other proposals across statehouses target drag performances, bathroom use, LGBTQ discussions in schools and medical gender transitions beyond age 18.

The Illinois House of Representatives has voted to shore up the state’s already-expansive reproductive rights and shield the influx of out-of-state patients seeking abortions in Illinois after the fall of Roe v. Wade. The bill approved Friday would prevent the governor from surrendering a person charged by another state if the charges are based providing or obtaining health care that is lawful in Illinois, even if the procedure is illegal in the other state. It also would offer protection for providers of gender-affirming health care such as hormonal treatment. And it would allow advanced-practice registered nurses and physician assistants to perform abortion procedures that don’t require general anesthesia.

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THURSDAY, Jan. 5, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Mpox cases reported in cisgender women represent 2.7 percent of all reported cases, according to research published in the Jan. 6 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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