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Smith fails to represent district

Jan. 6, the day rioters violently entered the U.S. Capitol, was a catastrophic day of historic consequence. Congress had the courage to return to its deliberations after the unprecedented attack. Later, Nebraska 3rd Congressional District Rep. Adrian Smith voted against accepting the Electoral College votes that were certified for Joe Biden.

In an interviews, Smith indicated he voted this way because he is concerned about elections. Smith, having served both in the Nebraska Legislature and the House of Representatives in Washington, knows that election reform occurs at the state level. He should be sharing his election concerns with Nebraska state legislators in Lincoln, not showboating in Washington.

It should have taken little courage to vote to accept the Electoral College votes as certified in the states.

At every level, from local voting precincts where people we know serve to help us cast our ballots all the way to U.S. Supreme Court, which evaluated filed lawsuits for merit concerning alleged voting impropriety and found none, all the facts have shown the election to have been fair.

In reality, Smith’s vote was not courageous. It was simply pandering to a portion of his base to retain his seat in Congress.

My fellow Nebraskans, the 3rd District is made up of citizens who know right from wrong.

What Smith did with his vote was wrong, and we deserve better, more honest representation.

Jerold Ebke, Fairbury

A bad message for students

There has been significant public attention directed towards the content of a student editorial in “The X-Change,” the Pius X student paper. The article itself is not remarkable. However, the principal’s response is unbecoming of an educator (“Pius X administrators apologize for student editorial many considered offensive,” Feb. 12).

Putting aside the editorial content, remember that students say, write and now often tweet strong opinions about the world.

From solving world hunger in three easy steps, to rolling their eyes out of their skull when parents protest vaping, children are full of snap judgments. That’s OK! It’s how they learn about what’s appropriate behavior in the world around them. We can afford the young lady at least that grace.

After publishing, Pius X released a statement that addressed the newfound attention, not by asking for grace and understanding for the student, but by platforming her position as their own. Principal Tom Korta was quoted in the Journal Star with several iterations of, “We’re sorry people are offended,” and continued the pattern from the press release of proselytizing the same ignorant view.

This was an opportunity for Korta to both protect his student and teach leadership by example. Instead, he chose to use her as a human shield to broadcast what clearly his own views into the world, and offered, “Sorry you’re sorry,” when asked for comment.

It is this reader’s opinion that he should reflect, or dare I say pray, on how to be a better adult and role model for his Pius kids.

Alex Fall, Beatrice

Arena vaccine event impressive

There were signs along the street. There were people standing in the cold showing the way. There were elected officials among the hundreds of volunteers.

I can’t begin to express just how impressed I was when my wife, Jan, and I ventured out on a very cold February day to get our first COVID vaccination. I’d seen the news reports to park in the garage attached to the Pinnacle Bank Arena, so imagine my surprise when we were greeted by people standing outside in the cold, waving us into the garage, then more people inside the garage directing us to drive up several levels, to greet us as we got out of the car, to hold the door for us as we walked into PBA, to point the way to the place where we picked up the information sheets and clearance forms we’d sign.

Then came the real surprise: Deb Schorr, a county commissioner, was volunteering at the table where we picked up the paper. Then as we headed toward the place where we’d get our vaccinations, there was Richard Meginnis, a member of the Lincoln City Council, volunteering to point the way.

The entire process went smoothly, and we even had volunteers thank us and hold the door for us as we left the arena and headed home. Thank you, Lincoln-Lancaster County Health Department, for coordinating things so well. Thank you to all of the volunteers, including elected officials. Be sure you’re registered and get your vaccination.

Randy Bretz, Lincoln

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