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“Many people in my (legislative) district, and elsewhere in Nebraska, feel marginalized and concerned about their safety now. They're worried about their families. Many of them came here to escape danger and they have built their lives in Omaha and in Nebraska.” – Omaha Sen. Tony Vargas, on the impact of immigration raids elsewhere to the state’s Latino community.

"It happened so fast you couldn’t even get sandbags. If you were walking, the water was following you up the sidewalk.” – Roger Jasnoch, executive director of the Kearney Visitor’s Bureau, on how quickly the city flooded following 9 inches of rain overnight.

“There's just not a lot of people around. That's our biggest thing. Everything's normal. Everything's fixed. It's the tourism that's affecting us now.” – Niobrara Village Chair Jody Stark, on the impact of flooding reducing tourist counts at Niobrara State Park.

“It’s imperative we illustrate good stewardship of taxpayer dollars from the state. But I think if we want to be competitive, to provide the best education for our students and have the best university for our state, you’ve got to spend money to attract good talent.” – Board of Regents Chairman Tim Clare on the idea of increasing pay to attract top candidate to be the next University of Nebraska president.

"A lot of the mascots in Nebraska represent a way of honoring the warrior spirit. If you're a school and you want a good mascot, you want to be the Chiefs or the Warriors. You don't want to be the Fighting Turtles." – Gordon Sen. Tom Brewer, a member of the Oglala Sioux Tribe, on the idea of banning Native mascots from Nebraska schools.

“Outraged is a better word. I’d put my career on the line to defend her as a person.” – Michigan softball coach Carol Hutchins, describing her feelings at the investigation into NU coach Rhonda Revelle.

"I have met gamblers who stopped gambling because of losses. I have never met one who stopped gambling because of excessive taxes.” – Former State Sen. Loran Schmit, advocating senators turn to newly authorized mechanical amusement devices to raise revenue and provide property tax relief.

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