Skip to main content
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
Top Indonesia court rules new job law unconstitutional
0 Comments
AP

Top Indonesia court rules new job law unconstitutional

  • 0

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Indonesia’s top court ruled Thursday that the country’s widely criticized Job Creation Law is unconstitutional and ordered the government to amend it within two years.

The law, passed last year, triggered days of protests in many cities that turned violent as thousands of enraged students and workers charged it would cripple labor rights and harm the environment.

The act amended 77 previous laws and was intended to improve bureaucratic efficiency as part of efforts by President Joko Widodo’s administration to attract more investment.

The Constitutional Court voted 5 to 4 in favor of the petitioners — a private company employee, four students and the Confederation of Indonesian Workers’ Unions, known as KSPI — who argued that the way the legislation was handled was procedurally flawed.

The court agreed, saying the process was not fully transparent and it was unclear whether the merging of the previous laws constituted a revision or the creation of a new law.

The court said the law will remain in effect until the revisions are made within two years and ordered the suspension of any broad strategic actions or issuance of new regulations linked to the law.

Chief Justice Anwar Usman said if the amendments are not made within two years, the legislation will be deemed “permanently unconstitutional” and “laws or articles that were already revoked or changed by the Job Creation Law must be revived.”

KSPI’s president, Said Iqbal, welcomed the ruling and said his party is ready to participate in the revision of the law to ensure it does not reduce the basic rights of workers.

He said the current law hurts workers by reducing severance pay, removing restrictions on manual labor by foreign workers, increasing the use of outsourcing and converting monthly salaries to hourly wages.

Coordinating Minister for Economic Affairs Airlangga Hartarto said the government respects the Constitutional Court’s decision.

“The government will immediately follow up on the court’s ruling by preparing for the law's amendment and carrying out other court orders the best we can,” he told a news conference.

Indonesia, Southeast Asia’s largest economy, is eagerly courting foreign investment as a key driver of economic growth in a nation where nearly half the population of 270 million is younger than 30.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

0 Comments
0
0
0
0
0

Be the first to know

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

  • Updated

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Pop star Justin Bieber is facing growing calls to cancel his concert in Saudi Arabia next month as the fiancee of slain Saudi critic Jamal Khashoggi joined a chorus of voices on Sunday urging him not to perform at the kingdom's Formula One race.

  • Updated

BEIJING (AP) — Missing Chinese tennis star Peng Shuai told Olympic officials in a video call from Beijing that she was safe and well, the International Olympic Committee said Sunday after Peng reappeared in public at a youth tournament in Beijing, according to photos released by the organizer.

  • Updated

A video call between the head of the International Olympic Committee and Chinese tennis player Peng Shuai, whose nearly three-week disappearance from public view sparked an outcry, was meant to reassure the world that she was safe — but instead has raised more questions.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News

Husker News