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33rd and Cornhusker corridor

Traffic rolls to a stop on North 33rd Street as a coal train moves along the BNSF Railway tracks just south of Cornhusker Highway.

The city and the Railroad Transportation Safety District invite the public to several events in January and February to learn about and comment on the final draft plans for road improvements in the 33rd Street and Cornhusker Highway area.

A related amendment to the Lincoln Metropolitan Planning Organization’s Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) is also part of the discussion.

* An open house is set for 5-7 p.m. Thursday at the Center for People in Need, 3901 N. 27th St. No formal presentations are planned, although representatives from the city, RTSD and design consultants will be available to discuss the plans. 

* The Lincoln/Lancaster County Planning Commission will hold a public hearing on the plans Jan. 23. The meeting begins at 1 p.m. in the City Council Chambers of the County-City Building. Written comments may be submitted at lincoln.ne.gov (keyword: pcagenda).

* The MPO’s Technical Advisory Committee will meet at 1:30 p.m. Jan. 31 in the Bill Luxford Studio on first floor of the County-City Building. The committee will consider the amendment to the plan that incorporates the 33rd and Cornhusker area and corridor enhancement plans. The agenda includes time for public comment, and written comments may be submitted to pbarnes@lincoln.ne.gov. The proposed LRTP amendment reports can be found at lincoln.ne.gov (keyword: mpo).

* The MPO Officials Committee will consider the LRTP amendment at its meeting at 9:30 a.m. Feb. 8 in the Mayor’s Conference Room of the County-City Building. The agenda includes time for public comment, and written comments may be submitted to pbarnes@lincoln.ne.gov.

The plans provide a longer-term vision for northeast Lincoln, from Salt Creek Roadway to Superior Street; between North 27th and North 48th streets; and along the Cornhusker Highway corridor between 11th and 56th streets.

The proposed plans will help guide city review of private projects and zoning, public transit and parks services, and the engineering and design of new transportation projects over the next 10 to 20 years.

The plans outline recommendations regarding land use, development and redevelopment; transportation and utility infrastructure; mobility; economic sustainability; and aesthetics.

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Assistant city editor

Shelly Kulhanek is assistant city editor.

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