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A 37-year-old Broken Bow man got 10 years in federal prison Thursday for cyberstalking.

Senior U.S. District Judge Richard G. Kopf sentenced Marshal Marshall to the maximum he could on the charge, plus three years of supervised release.

Marshall had pleaded guilty.

In a news release, United States Attorney Joe Kelly said in December 2017, the principal at a Broken Bow school reported to the FBI that someone was sending persistent and escalating threats of violence to a teacher there, at times impersonating other teachers, through school email.

Investigators found that Marshall had sent emails and texts impersonating teachers, friends and family members of the victim in order to harass, pressure, and coerce her into taking him back, ending her cooperation with state prosecutors on a drug case against him and doing other things he wanted her to do.

"The communications caused substantial emotional distress, made the victim feel like she was being followed or surveiled at all times, and placed her in fear of actual bodily harm,” Kelly said in the release.

He said she also faced threats to her reputation, both professionally and personally. Eventually, Marshall broke into the victim’s home and began to illegally wiretap her by putting recorders in her home and a motion sensor-activated camera in her bedroom. The FBI recovered them and tied them forensically to Marshall.

Text messages from Marshall’s cell phone showed he had solicited multiple men, his sister and two minors to aid him in the cyberstalking.

The case was investigated by the Broken Bow Police Department and the FBI.

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Reach the writer at 402-473-7237 or lpilger@journalstar.com.

On Twitter @LJSpilger.

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