Try 1 month for 99¢

Lincoln continues to love bigger-than-life creative concepts with which they can identify, whether a bike (Tour de Lincoln, 2003), star art (Star City Art Project, 2006), a lightbulb (Illuminating Lincoln: Lighthouse, 2015) or a heart (Nebraska by Heart, 2017).

We also love to see how an artist can transform an “everyday” object into a unique and unexpected piece of art.

“Public art is an example of heritage/cultural tourism in Lincoln and provides the opportunity for us to share examples of community pride and ownership,” said Jeff Maul, vice president and executive director of the Lincoln Convention & Visitors Bureau. “Through these projects, each tells a story about our community and the amazing people that give Lincoln its unique brand of charm and hospitality.

“This art not only provides reasons for people to discover all corners of our community; it can dress up a simple street corner and generate conversation between people and on social media,” Maul added. “This impacts return visits, extended stays by visitors and generates interest with freelance travel writers looking for something new and exciting in a community.”

Hands were selected as the latest sculpture concept in the Serving Hands public art project as they exemplify the heart of service for Campus Life, along with thousands of Lincoln’s citizens who love serving their community. Campus Life sees this as a celebration of all who serve, not just what the program does for Lincoln’s teens.

Sponsorships

A sponsorship is $5,000. By investing in a Nebraska artist and Campus Life, you are investing in both the creativity of gifted artists in our state and the spiritual health and growth of young people in our community. As a sponsor, you will give a helping hand in order that a sculpture will ultimately be created, which in turn will inspire the entire community.

“Lincoln has always generously supported our community’s public art projects,” said Liz Shea-McCoy, project director. “We are only at one-third of the way to our sponsorship goal of 50 beautiful sculptures around Lincoln. For that reason, I am reaching out to all in our community, inviting you to be a shareholder in this project and help bring another magnificent and amazing public art project to Lincoln.”

Individuals, civic organizations, businesses, families, groups of friends, schools and youth groups are encouraged to consider joining ranks as “shareholders” in a Nebraska artist by participating in whatever way they can, big or small, as a random act of kindness.

“Ultimately, those who are part of a sponsorship will feel an amazing sense of pride, as you will support a most worthy organization and allow an artist’s creative vision on paper to become a 6-foot sculptural reality, be recognized on the sculpture’s permanent plaque and select the site in Lincoln where you would love to see your sculpture installed,” Shea-McCoy explained.

Governor and First Lady are sponsors

First Lady Susanne Shore and Governor Pete Ricketts sponsored two Nebraska artists’ proposals.

“Pete and I appreciate being able to participate in the Serving Hands project as supporting the value of serving others,” Shore said. “Contributing to our community and making a difference in our world is dear to us. The project encapsulates all of this in a beautiful way that will have a lasting impact on Lincoln and the state.”

The sponsorship deadline is Jan. 15. Artists’ proposals can be seen at servinghandslincoln.org. You may also schedule an appointment with either Liz Shea-McCoy at 402-430-5923 or liz_shea@windstream.net, or Matt Schulte, executive director of Campus Life, at 402-617-2828 or matts@yfclincoln.org, to see the full-size sculpture in Old Historic City Hall, 920 O St., as well as the 81 design proposals located in the building’s second-floor courtroom.

0
0
0
0
0

L Magazine editor

Load comments