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Templeton

“The Diva and the Drama Queen” is one of the pieces in "Recent Works" by T.J. Templeton now on view at Bin 105

A large charcoal on paper “concept drawing for Jack Hotel album art” of a woman curled up on a couch with a cigarette between her fingers hangs on a wall in the gallery at Bin 105. Directly across the way is a suite of works made from gouache, charcoal and encaustic transfer that depict an old Kansas City bridge.

On another wall hangs a resin cast of a female torso; opposite it is a large mixed media painting of a pair of overstuffed armchairs sitting in the artist’s studio.

That’s a quick overview of the introductory local show of T.J. Templeton, a multifaceted “Painter by nature. Regionalist. Realist,” who recently moved to Lincoln from Kansas City.

Templeton, who studied at the Kansas City Art Institute, has tapped into the local music scene, doing designs for the Nebraska Folk & Roots Festival held in July and the cover for Jack Hotel’s “Good Sons and Daughters” on which the black-and-white study becomes full color and the image becomes a full room with a lamp and end table joining the couch and, of course, the nude woman.

The album cover image can be seen on Templeton’s website, templeton-arts.com, as can images from his Lincoln Music Project, a series of works from onsite sketches to studio portraits of bands and solo artists.

The drawing hangs next to “Judith with the head of Holophernes,” a four-sectioned, mixed media piece drawn from a story in the Book of Judith.

That story inspired dozens of Renaissance-era paintings, to which Templeton’s work pays homage with the depiction of a silver female head that looks as if it is from antiquity at the top of the image. Below the head is a color nude female chest, below that, the decapitated head of Holophernes (also spelled Holofernes) sits horizontally on what would be her lap and at the bottom are a pair of spindly legs covered with drips.

Drips also find their way into “A.S.B. Bridge,” a hazy charcoal and gouache on paper of the Kansas City bridge. It hangs below “A.S.B. Panorama,” an encaustic image transfer on five panels that are about 9 inches by 6 inches each, the picture of the bridge, boats on the river and a nearly smokestack spanning across the pieces.

Another encaustic transfer panoramic view of the bridge is much smaller, on 10 panels each about the size of a credit card. Together, the evocative pieces in “Take it to the Bridge,” Templeton’s title for the project, demonstrate his versatility and skill in multiple mediums.

Two large works, “Studio Panorama” and “The Diva and the Drama Queen” are labeled as mixed media on panel. But they appear to be primarily paintings, and they are impressive.

“The Diva and the Drama Queen,” to choose one of the pair, shows Templeton’s mastery of drapery, one of the challenges for painters from the Renaissance onward, an understanding of light and a vivid use of color. It is realistic, painterly and makes me want to see more of Templeton’s work. Welcome to Lincoln, T.J.

Bin 105 is holding the opening for Templeton’s show Friday -- “we’re doing Fourth Friday this month,” joked owner Steve Blazek. “Recent Works” will be on view there through November.

Reach the writer at 402-473-7244 or kwolgamott@journalstar.com. On Twitter @LJSWolgamott.

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Entertainment reporter/columnist

L. Kent Wolgamott is an entertainment reporter and columnist.

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