Try 1 month for 99¢
Joss Stone
Joss Stone (at a Fashion Week show in September in London) has a new release out Tuesday. (AP Photo)

Joss Stone, "Colour Me Free": Last year, Joss Stone got a group of musicians together and put together a fine but raw recording. Her record label didn't necessarily like what the young soul singer had put together. One listen to "Colour Me Free," released a year after it was recorded, makes you wonder why there was any hesitation. The 12 tracks are warm and vital, ranging from vintage '60s soul to contemporary R&B, finger-snapping up-tempo numbers, some tinges of funk and sultry ballads. A blue-eyed soul heir to the great Dusty Springfield, Stone is powerful and vulnerable, smart and sexy, growling and pure. She channels the past and is fully at home today, as can be heard on "Governmentalist," which features Nas rapping away. And she's just 22, promising stellar soul for decades to come. Grade: A-

Lyle Lovett, "Natural Forces": This is simultaneously a grab bag and homogenous, an album that is pure Lyle Lovett but fails to fully connect. Combining covers of songs by Texas songwriters, including the obligatory Townes Van Zandt tune and some Lovett originals, "Natural Forces" is stylishly presented with his cool cosmopolitan country approach applied to swing, honky tonk and ballads, and his vocals drier and more nasally than ever. The double entendres "Pantry" and "Farmer Brown/ Chicken Reel" bring his dry wit back onto the disc, and he has some killer versions of songs you've likely never heard before, including David Ball's "Don't You Think I Feel It Too." But this drifts along with too many folk songs back to back, some throwaway tracks and a strange spoken/sung collaboration with Robert Earl Keen called "It's Rock and Roll." It all sound good, but very little sticks. Grade: B-

0
0
0
0
0

Tags

Load comments