Details for LJS CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING - Ad from 2019-11-09

What was tested? 2020 Toyota Corolla LE Hybrid ($22,950).
Wheelbase: 106.3 in.
Length: 182.3 in. Width: 70.1 in. Height: 56.5 in.
Engine: 1.8L 4-cyl. w/ 53-kW electric motor.
Transmission: Continuously variable.
Fuel economy: 53 city, 52 highway.
Why buy it?
The new-generation Corolla has a more engaged, solid driving feel
and excellent level of equipment on the base model. The hybrid
version gets Prius-like gas mileage without the oddball styling.

Toyota Debuts Corolla Hybrid
By Derek Price Cargazing.com

All-New Sedan Similar to Prius but Looks More ‘Normal’
Let’s start with the obvious
question: why does this car exist?
Considering how Toyota already
makes the Prius — arguably the
best and unquestionably the most
popular hybrid car on the planet
— it’s tough to make the case that
the newfor-2020 Corolla Hybrid is
necessary.
They’re both priced about the
same, starting at $23,100 for the
first-ever hybrid version of the
Corolla and $24,200 for the more
wellknown Prius.
They’re both rated within spitting distance of identical fuel
economy, too, with the Prius getting a slightly better rating in the
city and the Corolla winning on
the highway. The Corolla Hybrid
is rated for 53 mpg in town and 52

on the highway, compared to 54
and 50 for the Prius.
They’re even similar in functionality and driving feel, with a
practical fourdoor layout, reasonably roomy back seat and acceleration clearly designed more for
sipping gas than for winning stoplight races.
On paper, they’re practically the
same car.
I think the gas-electric Corolla
exists for one reason, though:
some buyers are turned off by the
Prius’ weirdness.
The Corolla Hybrid can offer
the same benefits while looking
and feeling much more “normal”
for people who don’t want to deal
with the Earth-saving, vegan, hippie, Prius-driving stereotypes.

It also benefits from the same
advantages the allnew-for-2020
regular Corolla brings to the table.
While it’s still far from a sports
sedan, the new Corolla gets a
complete makeover that helps it
feel more solid and engaging from
the driver’s seat. This new generation feels connected to the road in
a way that the last generation
never did, mainly thanks to better
suspension tuning and improved
steering.
It also comes with a surprising
level of standard equipment for
the price, including a package of
active safety and convenience features called Toyota Safety Sense
2.0.
That means every Corolla —
even the base gasoline-only version priced at $19,600 — comes

with radar cruise control, lane
departure alert with steering
assist, automatic high beams,
road sign assist and even lane
tracing assist, which essentially
steers the car for you to keep it
centered in the lane of a wellmarked highway or street.
That’s unusual because most of
its competitors limit those features to their luxury trim levels or
offer them as upgrades for an
extra charge.
It also comes standard with a
highly capable infotainment system with an 8-inch touchscreen,
Apple CarPlay and a built-in
Amazon Alexa assistant.
Driving the Corolla Hybrid is
unremarkable, which I think is the
whole point. Its cabin feels comfortable and familiar, and neither

its body nor its powertrain yell for
attention about its remarkably
advanced contents under the
skin, including a powerful but
small battery that is packaged
under the back seat and two electric motors that improve the fuel
efficiency of its 1.8-liter gasoline
engine.
Interestingly, the Corolla
Hybrid is only available in a single
trim level, the LE, with cloth seats
and a very well-equipped cabin.
You just choose your color and
pick from a short list of accessories such as a cargo net in the
trunk, door sill protectors or carpeted floor mats.
It’s an exercise in simplicity for
both design and the sales process.
In an overcomplicated world,
Toyota’s approach is refreshing.

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