A recent article in a national journal, written by two elder statesmen from opposite sides of the aisle, lamented the lack of civil discourse, of conversation, that once was a hallmark of the art of politics. Its absence, they pointed out, is not a win for anyone; its absence hurts us all.

A recent FSBO seller (not represented by a Realtor) made some assumptions and modified the course of action spelled out on the inspection addendum. In doing so he put our contract in jeopardy and our transaction at risk. Both sides of this transaction were damaged by these assumptions and actions. A phone call to discuss some new information would have allowed for a mutually agreed to solution. However, no conversation occurred and there was no winner here either.

It was a very long escrow, the fine print inked months ago and easily forgotten. Closing day was finally here. Sellers moved out, cleaned and passed the keys. Buyer walked through just prior to close. All was almost in order. I say almost because the refrigerator was not there as the buyers expected. We checked the contract and sure enough it was indeed supposed to be left. Time for a chat. Sellers were certainly disappointed (after all, who needs one more thing to deal with after a move?), but thanks to a productive and timely conversation the situation was resolved to the satisfaction of all.

What assumptions might you have? I could never sell my house in its current condition. Or, my house will fetch top dollar if I don’t do a thing. Maybe it’s that moving is too much work or it will be a piece of cake. My agent only works with this price/area of housing. Do any of these resound with you?

I’ve just started reading a book about reclaiming the art of conversation. This quote caught my eye “appetite comes from eating….ideas come from speaking.” Seems about right to me. From national politics to local real estate, conversation is key. I’m not much help with national politics, but for real estate, I’m all ears. Let’s chat.

Angry
0
Sad
0
Funny
0
Wow
0
Love
0

Load comments